Romanov, E. R.

A self-described self-made man, Romanov was an importat Belarusian public intellectual, collecting folklore, publishing a newspaper, active in the school system in Mogilev, and he excavated more than 1,000 kurgans around Belarus. His most significant find was the Borisov Stone, one of the Dvina Stones. As head of the NW branch of the Imperial Geographical Society, Romanov embodies the importance of the local to the imperial.

Inostrantsev, A. A.

One of Russia’s foremost geologists, Inostrantsev worked with archeologists in making determinations about the Stone Age in Russia. As a student, he worked originally in chemistry under Dmitrii Mendeleev, but a passion for rocks displaced chemistry and in 1868 be began curating the newly founded Geological Cabinet at the Academy of Sciences. In 1869 he defended his dissertation on his geological research in northern Russia, where he had uncovered numerous skulls around Lake Ladoga, which he turned over to anthropologists, who overlapped with archeologists in the Stone Age in particular. With A. P. Bogdanov, Inostrantsev helped to found the Society of Lovers of Natural Science, Anthropology and Geography. Bogdanov’s foremost mentee and activist in the IMAO Dmitrii Anuchin discovered the bones of domesticated dogs at Ladoga and named them canis inostrantsev. Inostrantsev merits mention as an archeologist because of his work in helping to decipher the prehistory of civilization.